Interesting web redesign fee structure
May 25, 2004

The web is full of serendipitous connections.

One example: today, I was reading the article in the Washington Post about the how the US-led authority in Baghdad's website's design lifted directly from the Brooking Institution's newly designed site.

The artlcle goes on to say that Brookings had paid a lot for the design by Roger Black. As I was browsing through Mr. Black's site, I came across the firm's web redesign methodology. The last slide talks about how much the whole procedure costs:

Unlike traditional redesign, Black Line fees scale to the size of the site. Like software, we charge by the "seat", by the number of people on your team that will be handling the pages. The price per seat is $5000; the general range of a Black Line redesign is $15-50,000. Multiple Web sites my receive discounts.

Now how exactly does this work? Is that web masters or stakeholders? I can imagine a situation where this pricing may work well to mitigate the risk that comes with having a large group of stakeholders involved in the process.


May 25, 2004

A great cross-comparison study of web icons across sites. It reminded me of the Appendix of Jakob Nielsen's Homepage Usability where he compares the use of homepage real estate, logos, search boxes, images, shopping carts across the 50 sites he deconstructs, but it's not as detailed or broad (or graphically appealing presentation-wise) as this one.